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GCA 2018 Highlights: Crushing on Christine Lagarde, Chobani’s Ulukaya is More than Just a Yogurt Maker, And More

More than 500 guests from fifty countries attended the Atlantic Council’s 9th annual Global Citizen Awards dinner in New York City on September 24. The award was presented to Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg; Argentine President Mauricio Macri; Hamdi Ulukaya, founder, chairman, and chief executive officer of Chobani; and the late Arizona Republican Sen. John S. McCain. Frederick Kempe, president and chief executive officer of the Atlantic Council, said the Global Citizen Award was launched with three goals in mind. “First, we wanted to identify individuals who represent the sort of leadership and engagement we thought defined global citizenship at its best.  Second, we hope that by recognizing these individuals, we could inspire a host of others.  And finally, we wanted to underscore a pretty dramatic shift at the Atlantic Council, our own expanded global mission of galvanizing more effective efforts among friends and allies, certainly at our transatlantic core, but also globally, to secure the future at a time when we had anticipated would be a moment or an era of historic challenge,” he said.

Chobani CEO Hamdi Ulukaya Considers Going Public

by  Lillie Apostolos - In an industry that is constantly seeing quick movements and strategic approaches to business handlings, it appears that we could be seeing a change in Chobani in the future after the company’s Founder and CEO Hamdi Ulukaya sat down in discussion with Recode. The businessman shared that he isn’t against taking the yogurt company public, but has no interest in selling it off to a food conglomerate. “What happens is all these little brands, these good brands, as they grow, because of the financial structure, 99 percent of them become part of larger organizations,” he said while speaking at Code Commerce conference in New York City. “When they become part of a larger organization, it’s the end of their promise.”

Chobani Exploring 'Significant' Expansion of Upstate NY Yogurt Plant

South Edmeston, N.Y. -- Chobani is considering building a significant expansion of its yogurt plant in South Edmeston, according to sou rces familiar with the matter.The sources said the expansion is being actively explored and would enable the company to expand products manufactured in the facility. Chobani's yogurt plant on County Route 25 near the Unadilla River employs approximately 1,000 people. The expansion the company is considering could result in the creation of a significant number of additional jobs, the sources said.

Hamdi Ulakaya Backed La Colombe considers selling a stake in the Philly-based coffee company

La Colombe, the premium coffee brand backed by billionaire yogurt mogul Hamdi Ulukaya, has hired Moelis & Co. to explore fundraising options, including the sale of a stake in the company.
The company is seeking a valuation north of $1 billion and is open to selling a minority or majority stake, according to a person familiar with the matter. La Colombe may also decide to take on outside investors in a bid to fuel growth, said the person, who asked not to be identified because the deliberations are private.

The Chobani Way: Insights to Build Culture and Community

Hamdi Ulukaya never thought he would end up running a corporation in the United States. Growing up in a family of dairy farmers in eastern Turkey, the CEO of Chobani dreamed of making a career in public service. A few decades later, Chobani is a billion-dollar company built on a firm footing of social responsibility and inclusive company culture. On the stage at NRF 2018: Retail’s Big Show in New York City, Ulukaya recounted the story of building the business and its unique corporate culture to Terry Lundgren, recently retired executive chairman and chairman of the board of Macy’s Inc.

US-based Turkish Yogurt Tycoon Married in New York

United States based Chobani CEO Hamdi Ulukaya was married with Food Dreams Foundation president Louise Vongerichten, at the Turkish Consulate General in New York with a simple ceremony on Jan. 25. Ulukaya, 45, is of Turkish origin and the founder of the Chobani yogurt firm. His wife, 30, is of French origin and the co-founder of Food Dreams Foundation. The couple will reportedly hold a wedding ceremony in Turkey in summer months.

As Chobani Expands Footprint in Twin Falls, City Reflects on Anti-refugee Backlash

By Patrick Sisson - Curbed.com - For Hamdi Ulukaya, founder and CEO of the Greek yogurt-making giant Chobani, Twin Falls, Idaho, helped his company expand in ways he could barely imagine when he arrived in the United States in 1994 as a Turkish college student who didn’t speak English. The small city of 48,000 in the Magic Valley, an agricultural center in the southern part of the state, home to the company’s 1 million-square-foot factory, will soon be the centerpiece of a new chapter for Chobani, one of the last decade’s most successful new food brands.

Chobani Gets New Look and Hints at Going Beyond Yogurt

Chobani, the company that helped kick-start the Greek yogurt craze, is shrinking those words on its label as it may expand beyond that food in an increasingly crowded yogurt market. The new look, which will show up in supermarkets this week, removes "Greek Yogurt" from underneath the Chobani name. The yogurt inside will stay the same. Its packaging will be more muted than the current bright white, use a new font and style, and feature watercolor paintings of fruits rather than photographs of strawberries and peaches.

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