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Dr. Oz Recounts His Visits to Syrian Refugee Camps

By Faruk Zorlu, AA - ANKARA - Turkish-American surgeon and talk show host Dr. Mehmet Oz said he was greatly moved by his visits in July to refugee camps in Turkey and Syria, noting it was something he would never forget. "I had the opportunity to visit Syrian refugee camps along the Syria-Turkey border with the help of [Turkey’s Disaster and Emergency Management Authority] AFAD and [the Turkish Red Crescent] Kizilay. "Despite the hardships the people we met have endured, their stories of resilience are inspiring - this is a trip that has forever changed me," Oz said Monday in a post on his Twitter account. Oz -- who is widely known for his television program The Dr. Oz Show, which has won several Daytime Emmy Awards -- visited refugee camps in Turkey's southeastern Gaziantep province and Syria's northwestern Azaz region in July.

Turkey's Syrian Refugees Carve Out Their Own Opportunities

Gaziantep, Turkey - A group of Syrian children already well versed in the language of despair now have a chance to learn a vocabulary of hope at the Excellence Education Centre in Turkey's Gaziantep. In a bright and colourful classroom, the kids enthusiastically recite some of the Turkish phrases they'll need in their new homeland from a curriculum designed by the centre's owner, Asmaa Joha. "When I would look into the eyes of Syrian children, I was feeling afraid," explains Asmaa. "I wondered how they would feel when they got older and if I had done my duty and served them well as a teacher."

  • Published in Women

Turkey's Syrian Refugees Carve Out Their Own Opportunities

Gaziantep, Turkey - A group of Syrian children already well versed in the language of despair now have a chance to learn a vocabulary of hope at the Excellence Education Centre in Turkey's Gaziantep. In a bright and colourful classroom, the kids enthusiastically recite some of the Turkish phrases they'll need in their new homeland from a curriculum designed by the centre's owner, Asmaa Joha. "When I would look into the eyes of Syrian children, I was feeling afraid," explains Asmaa. "I wondered how they would feel when they got older, and if I had done my duty and served them well as a teacher."

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